IT'S TIME

To Rethink

Vaping.

Vaping has different risks than smoking, and it’s not safe for teens. Considering the chemicals in the aerosol, the risks to your health, and the tobacco company connections, it’s time to rethink vaping.

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WHAT’S IN THE AEROSOL?

IT’S JUST “HARMLESS WATER VAPOR” RIGHT? WRONG.

Many teens think that vaping is a healthy alternative to smoking traditional cigarettes with no downside. Unfortunately, that’s just not the case. Aerosol from e-cigs and vape devices, like JUUL, is risky for your health. Some people believe the aerosol going into the lungs and exhaled out is just water vapor.

But recent lab tests show that aerosol is actually loaded with chemicals such as; diacetyl, nitrosamines, acrolein, diethylene glycol, propylene glycol, vegetable glycerin and, of course, nicotine. Even though some chemicals are “generally recognized as safe” to have in food and drinks, they are not necessarily safe for you to breathe into your lungs. Also, toxic chemicals like formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and ultrafine particles have been found in vape aerosol. These chemicals have big names, but what are they exactly? Read below:

Sources

  • Agency for Toxic Substances & Disease Registry. Toxic Substances Portal. Retrieved from https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/substances/toxchemicallisting.asp?sysid=38
  • Arnold, C. (2016). On the vapor trail: examining the chemical content of e-cigarette flavorings. Environmental health perspectives, 124(6), A115.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2018). Electronic Cigarettes. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/basic_information/e-cigarettes/index.htm
  • Jensen, R.P., Luo, W., Pankow, J.F., Strongin, R.M., & Peyton, D.H. (2015). Hidden formaldehyde in e-cigarette aerosols. New England Journal of Medicine, 372(4), 392-394.
  • Krishnan-Sarin, S., Morean, M., Kong, G., Bold, K. W., Camenga, D. R, et al. (2017). E-Cigarettes and “Dripping” Among High-School Youth, Pediatrics, 139(3), e20163224. doi: 10.1542/peds.2016-3224
  • National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2018). Public health consequences of e-cigarettes. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: https://doi.org/10.17226/24952
  • Pellegrino, R.M., Tinghino, B., Mangiaracina, G., Cattaruzza, M.S. (2012). Electronic cigarettes: an evaluation of exposure to chemicals and fine particulate matter. Annali Di Igiene, 24(4), 279-88.
  • Raloff, J. (2015) The Dangers of Vaping: Teens are falling for flavored e-cigs, but the vapors they inhale may be toxic, Science News, 188(1) doi: 0.1002/scin.2015.188001019
  • Raymond, B., Collette-Merrill, K., Harrison, R. G., Jarvis, S., Rasmussen, R. (2017). The Nicotine Content of a Sample of E-cigarette Liquid Manufactured in the United States. Journal of Addiction Medicine. doi: 10.1097/ADM.0000000000000376 [EPUB Ahead of Print]
  • U.S. Department of Labor. Occupational Safety and Health Administration. (2012). Diacetyl. Retrieved from (https://www.osha.gov/dts/chemicalsampling/data/CH_231710.html)
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Service. E-Cigarette Use among Youth and Young Adults: A report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health.
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office on Smoking and Health. (2015). Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems: Key Facts. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/stateandcommunity/pdfs/ends-key-facts-oct-2016.pdf
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Nicotine

You may have heard about nicotine before. But why is nicotine so bad? Nicotine is the addictive chemical in cigarettes and most vapes. Addictive chemicals trick your brain into thinking it’s getting something good. And teens can get hooked on nicotine more easily than adults. Plus, nicotine is as addictive as heroin, cocaine, and alcohol! Which means quitting (smoking OR vaping) is hard to do. For teens, it gets worse; nicotine can harm your brain development, which may affect comprehension, critical thinking, attention, learning, and mood. Plus, nicotine raises your blood pressure and increases your heartbeat.

Even scarier, unlike many other products (like foods and drugs), e-cigarettes are not regulated. That means that no one is checking what the companies say is in e-cigarettes or vapes, e-liquid (“e-juice”) or vape pods. Some studies have found that the actual nicotine content in some e-liquids is different than what it says on the label. E-liquid advertised as “nicotine free” has even been found to contain nicotine. Also alarming is that a single JUUL pod contains more nicotine than one pack, or more than 20 regular cigarettes.

Other Chemicals That May

Be Found in Vape Juice:

vaping Acrolein

ACROLEIN

Used as a pesticide to control algae, weeds, bacteria, and mollusks. It’s also used to make other chemicals.

vaping metals

METAL AND FIBER PARTICLES

Metals like tin are present in vapor. Because these metals come from the device, they are not even present in regular cigarettes.

vaping nitrosamines

NITROSAMINES

Can cause cancer. They are volatile and highly flammable organic compounds, and some have been used in medication.

vaping diacetyl

DIACETYL

Inhaling this chemical may cause permanent, severe, and potentially deadly lung disease. Breathing in diacetyl at high levels has been shown to cause a serious lung disease sometimes referred to as “popcorn lung”.

vaping formaldehyde

FORMALDEHYDE

Is a chemical widely used to make home building products. Formaldehyde is so harmful that there are rules to lower contact with formaldehyde in the home. Formaldehyde may cause chest pain, shortness of breath, coughing, and nose and throat irritation. Breathing in high levels of formaldehyde may cause cancer and increase the risk of asthma and allergies in kids.

vaping diethylene-glycol

DIETHYLENE GLYCOL

A key ingredient used in antifreeze.

Health Risks

HARVARD STUDY:

3 OUT OF 4 VAPE JUICES CONTAIN CHEMICALS LINKED TO LUNG DISEASE

While vaping may avoid some of the cancer causing ingredients that occur when you light traditional tobacco cigarettes, there are still other risks because of the flavors and other chemicals in vape juice and vape pods. Since vaping has only been around for a short period of time, it’s too early to really know the long-term effects of vaping on your health. But we do know some of the possible short-term health effects, such as:

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LUNG FUNCTION

Even if vapes or JUULs have different bad effects than traditional cigarettes, vaping still reduces lung function. Breathing in the ultra-fine particles from vaping can irritate your lungs and may start an asthma attack. Studies have shown lung cell damage from vape juice—including those that have nicotine, and the chemicals used to make the flavors.

vape device blowing up

VAPES ARE BLOWING UP. LITERALLY

If you're thinking about health concerns from vaping, you’re usually thinking about the chemicals in the aerosol; not the devices themselves. But, guess what? Some vape devices have exploded and caused third degree burns to the face, chest, and hands.

vaping heart problems

HEART PROBLEMS

Breathing in aerosol can cause tightening or narrowing in your arteries, which could lead to a heart attack.

POISONING AND CHOKING

You can get "nic sick," or overdose on nicotine, from vaping and JUULing. Kids, pets and non-users can also get really sick or die if they swallow or even touch a very small amount of vape liquid.

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Second Hand "Vapor"

It’s actually aerosol, not vapor, and when it goes into the air it can be breathed in by others; similar to second hand smoke from traditional cigarette smoke. And if a pregnant person is exposed to second hand aerosol, the nicotine can affect the lung and brain development of the unborn child. It may also hurt pets, friends or family members, especially someone with asthma.

Big Tobacco

"New" Vape Companies, Up to the Same Old Tricks.

For years, Big Tobacco companies told consumers that smoking was fine, non-addictive, and even healthy. Over time, we realized that these statements about cigarettes were false and misleading and that smoking cigarettes does cause serious health problems like emphysema and lung cancer. Cigarette smoking also causes more than 480,000 deaths per year in the United States alone – with more than 41,000 deaths resulting simply from secondhand smoke exposure!

Big Tobacco companies are at it again. People are buying fewer traditional cigarettes, so the major tobacco companies are investing a lot of money into e-cig or vaping products. In fact, all the major players in tobacco own at least one vape company. They want people to get addicted to their new product. JUUL is even connected with a Big Tobacco company.

Links Between Cigarette and Vape Brands

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Tobacco Company

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Reynolds
(Lorillard / RJ Reynolds)

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Altria
(Philip Morris)

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Imperial
Tobacco

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cigarette brands

Camel
Pall Mall
Newport
American Spirit

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Marlboro
Parliament
Virginia Slims


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Winston
Salem
Kool
Maverick

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E-Cig Brands

Vuse

Green Smoke
Mark Ten
IQOS
JUUL

Blu

Cigs Then and E-Cigs Now: Is there a difference?

Big Tobacco companies are advertising to consumers the same way they have in the past with cigarettes. And guess who they’re targeting? Teens.

  • More than 18 million (7 in 10) U.S. middle and high school youth were exposed to vape ads in 2014.
  • In 2015, ad spending by e-cigarette and vape companies reached $37 million.
  • One CEO of a top vape brand even said other manufacturers used flavorings “to attract children.”

Just look at these examples to see how these “new” e-cig/vape companies are up to the same old tricks:

Sources