It's Time
to Rethink
Vaping.

Vaping may be less risky than smoking, but it’s not safe for teens. Considering the chemicals in the vapor, the risks to your health, and the tobacco company connections, it’s time to rethink vaping.

Nicotine

You may have heard about nicotine before. But why is nicotine so bad? Nicotine is the addictive chemical in cigarettes and most vapes. Addictive chemicals trick your brain into thinking it is getting something good. And teens can get hooked on nicotine more easily than adults. Nicotine is as addictive as heroin, cocaine, and alcohol. Which means quitting (smoking OR vaping) is hard to do. For teens, it gets worse; nicotine has harmful effects on your brain development, which may affect comprehension and critical thinking, attention, carefulness, learning, and mood. Plus, nicotine raises your blood pressure and increases your heartbeat.

Even scarier, unlike many other products (like foods and drugs), e-cigarettes are not regulated. That means that no one is checking what the companies say is in e-cigarettes and vape liquid (“juice”). Some studies have found that the actual nicotine content that’s in vape juice is different from what the label says. Vape juice advertised as “nicotine free” has even been found to contain nicotine. Also alarming is that a single Juul pod contains as much nicotine as 20 cigarettes.

  • Acrolein
    Used as a pesticide to control algae, weeds, bacteria, and mollusks. It’s also used to make other chemicals.
  • Metal and fiber particles
    Metals like tin are present in vapor. Because these metals come from the device, they are not even present in regular cigarettes.
  • Nitrosamines
    Can cause cancer. They are volatile and highly flammable organic compounds, and some have been used in medication.
  • Diacetyl
    Inhaling this chemical may cause permanent, severe, and potentially deadly lung disease. Breathing in diacetyl at high levels has been shown to cause a serious lung disease sometimes referred to as “popcorn lung”.
  • Formaldehyde
    Is a chemical widely used to make home building products. Formaldehyde is so harmful that there are rules to lower contact with formaldehyde in the home. Formaldehyde may cause chest pain, shortness of breath, coughing, and nose and throat irritation. Breathing in high levels of formaldehyde may cause cancer and increase the risk of asthma and allergies in kids.
  • Diethylene glycol
    A key ingredient used in antifreeze.
  • Lung Function
    Even if vaping has fewer bad effects than traditional cigarettes, vaping still reduces lung function. Breathing in the ultra-fine particles from vaping can irritate your lungs and may start an asthma attack. Studies have shown lung cell damage from vape juice—including those that have nicotine and those that do not.
  • Vape devices are Blowing Up. Literally
    If you are thinking about health concerns from vaping, you’re usually thinking about the chemicals in the vapor; not the devices themselves. But, guess what? Some vape devices have exploded and caused third degree burns to the face, chest, and hands.
  • Heart Problems
    Breathing in vapor can cause tightening or narrowing of the arteries, which could lead to a heart attack.

Second Hand Vapor

Vapor goes into the air and can be breathed in by others; similar to second hand smoke from traditional cigarette smoke. And if a pregnant person is exposed to second hand vapor, the nicotine can affect the lung and brain development of the unborn child. It may also hurt friends or family members, especially someone with asthma.

Links between cigarette and vape brands

Tobacco Company
grid line Reynolds
(Lorillard / RJ Reynolds)
grid line Altria
(Philip Morris)
grid line Imperial
Tobacco
Cigarette Brands
grid arrow Camel
Pall Mall
Newport
American Spirit
grid arrow Marlboro
Parliament
Virginia Slims
grid arrow Winston
Salem
Kool
Maverick
E-Cig Brands
grid line Vuse
grid line Green Smoke
Mark Ten
grid line Blue

Big Tobacco companies are advertising to consumers the same way they have in the past with cigarettes. And guess who they are targeting? Teens.

  • More than 18 million (7 in 10) U.S. middle and high school youth were exposed to vape ads in 2014.
  • In 2015, ad spending by e-cigarette and vape companies reached $37 million.
  • One CEO of a top vape brand even said other manufacturers used flavorings “to attract children.”

Just look at these examples to see how these “new” e-cig/vape companies are up to the same old tricks:

Sources
Cigs Then and E-Cigs Now:
Is there a difference?

Spread the Word

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